Tabasco

Welcome to Tabasco, a tropical land with exuberant vegetation, and a land of history, rich in traditions. It sa the flowering of one of the most ancient and important Mesoamerican civilizations, the Olmec, and later the Maya dominated the region.

The State of Tabasco is located to the southeast of Mexico and occupies a surface of 24,475.24 km2 with a population of approximately 1’891,829  inhabitants.

In the past local people earned a living from farming, cattle ranching and trade and during the 19th and 20th centuries, the city became an important distribution center for tropical crops such as bananas, cacao and hardwoods. However, the oil boom changed the face of the city, since it drew people from all over the country, which in turn required the construction of new housing developments.

Tabasco limit to the north with the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest with the State of Campeche, to the southwest with the Republic of Guatemala, to the south with the State of Chiapas and to the west with the State of Veracruz. Has 17 municipalities understood in 4 zones (The Chontalpa, The Center, The Saw and The Rivers).

The nahuas were calling to this Mayan territory ONOHUALCO, when was governing by Taabz Cobb and the powers were residing in its capital Comalcalco.

The word Tabasco is derived from the voice Tla-uash-co, that in Mexican language means “Place that has owner”, though some translate it as “waterlogged Earth”. 27 of March of 1519, Taabz Cobb swear obedience to the king of Spain.

Due to Tabasco location and to its scarce increase on the level of the sea, the climate is warm with maritime influence, being registered a minimal temperature of 15º to 20º C., of January to February and a maxim of 40º C., of April to June. The annual average is greater to 26º C.

  • Comalcalco Archaeological Zone
  • La Venta (Olmec)
  • El Azufre
  • Paraiso
  • Emiliano Zapata
  • Pomona
  • Grutas de Cocona
  • Tapijulapa
  • Laguna del Rosario
  • Villahermosa

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